Wishtree

An Amazon Top 20 Children’s Books of 2017 The New York Times-bestselling story of kindness, friendship, and hope. Trees can’t tell jokes, but they can certainly tell stories. . . .Red is an oak tree who is many rings old. Red is the neighborhood “wishtree”―people write their wishes on pieces of cloth and tie them

An Amazon Top 20 Children’s Books of 2017

The New York Times-bestselling story of kindness, friendship, and hope.

Trees can’t tell jokes, but they can certainly tell stories. . . .
Red is an oak tree who is many rings old. Red is the neighborhood “wishtree”―people write their wishes on pieces of cloth and tie them to Red’s branches. Along with a crow named Bongo and other animals who seek refuge in Red’s hollows, this wishtree watches over the neighborhood.
You might say Red has seen it all.
Until a new family moves in. Not everyone is welcoming, and Red’s experience as a wishtree is more important than ever.
Funny, deep, warm, and nuanced, this is Katherine Applegate at her very best―writing from the heart, and from a completely unexpected point of view.
This book has Common Core connections.

Comments

TN says:

cool, steady I’ll be honest, I was doubtful that middle grade readers would retain interest in a book narrated by a “wise old tree.” Red is the antithesis of what you see in many action-packed middle grade stories: calm, cool, steady, stationary, quiet. Fortunately, the tree’s animal friends provide movement and comic relief, both with their antics and with their ridiculous self-naming systems (skunks, for example, name themselves after their favorite smells, resulting in monikers like FreshBakedBread.) The book’s human characters are more enigmatic. We only see small insights into their actions and motivations from Red’s stationary vantage point. 

Christa Avampato says:

The book we all need to read right now A story of acceptance and community told from the perspective of a wise 216-year-old northern red oak tree named Red, I read the book the Wishtree in one delicious (or is it deciduous) sitting. I laughed, I cried, and I was happy / sad when it was over. This is the book the world needs now more than ever. Pun-filled tree humor provides the laughter than opens the way to understanding that diversity is the key to a healthy, thriving society. Nature knows that. Nature has always known that. And it’s time for us to embrace it, too.  A new Muslim family moves into the neighborhood and faces the ugliest side of human nature. The power of friendship, bravery, and history are woven together in this tale, part magic, part science, and all love. In Applegate’s own words, there is a special kind of power in being able to stand tall and reach deep in all circumstances. Leave it to children’s literature to teach us (adults and children alike) to be the very people we can be.  

J. Dieterle says:

A quiet, thoughtful book 3.5 stars. I know tons of folks have adored this book. And I liked it. But it’s a quiet book, a thoughtful book. And those are not always a good fit for me as a reader. If you have children/students who enjoy quiet, thoughtful books that move a little more slowly to allow for thinking, then this might be a great fit for them. If you have readers who want things to move quickly and have lots of action, they may struggle to finish this one.

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