The Power

One of the New York Times’s Ten Best Books of 2017A Los Angeles Times Best Book of 2017One of the Washington Post’s Ten Best Books of 2017An NPR Best Book of 2017One of Entertainment Weekly’s Ten Best Books of 2017A Bustle Best Book of 2017A Paste Magazine Best Novel of 2017A San Francisco Chronicle Best

One of the New York Times’s Ten Best Books of 2017A Los Angeles Times Best Book of 2017One of the Washington Post’s Ten Best Books of 2017An NPR Best Book of 2017One of Entertainment Weekly’s Ten Best Books of 2017A Bustle Best Book of 2017A Paste Magazine Best Novel of 2017A San Francisco Chronicle Best Book of 2017
One of President Obama’s favorite reads of 2017
“The Power is our era’s The Handmaid’s Tale.” –Ron Charles, Washington Post
“Novels based on premises like the one at the core of The Power can quickly become little more than thought experiments, but Alderman dodges this trap deftly — her writing is beautiful, and her intelligence seems almost limitless. She also has a pitch-dark sense of humor that she wields perfectly.” –Michael Schaub, NPR
A New York Times Book Review Editors’ Choice
An Amazon Best Book of 2017
**WINNER OF THE 2017 BAILEYS WOMEN’S PRIZE FOR FICTION**

What would happen if women suddenly possessed a fierce new power?

In THE POWER, the world is a recognizable place: there’s a rich Nigerian boy who lounges around the family pool; a foster kid whose religious parents hide their true nature; an ambitious American politician; a tough London girl from a tricky family. But then a vital new force takes root and flourishes, causing their lives to converge with devastating effect. Teenage girls now have immense physical power–they can cause agonizing pain and even death. And, with this small twist of nature, the world drastically resets.

From award-winning author Naomi Alderman, THE POWER is speculative fiction at its most ambitious and provocative, at once taking us on a thrilling journey to an alternate reality, and exposing our own world in bold and surprising ways.

Comments

Bookreporter says:

Naomi Alderman is a skillful writer whose book bristles with intelligence and wit If you haven’t read it, you’ve probably seen it: Margaret Atwood’s THE HANDMAID’S TALE, published in 1985 but made newly famous by the Hulu miniseries. It’s likely the best-known dystopia in recent history, and I mention it because Atwood’s monumental presence hangs over this book. Not that Naomi Alderman is a nobody. Her debut novel, DISOBEDIENCE, got the Orange Award for New Writers in 2006, and THE POWER, her latest (first published in the UK), won the 2017 Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction. But Atwood is clearly a friend and mentor (the book is dedicated to her and her husband), and as for the theme — well, call it the anti-HANDMAID’S TALE. 

Kate Vane says:

Not powerful enough At the heart of gender politics is the question of whether men and women are inherently different, or are shaped by our experiences. The Power takes this on by asking, what would happen if women gained a physical advantage over men? Would the world be transformed into a nurturing, empathetic utopia? Or do women and men who get power inevitably exploit it? 

Erin Portman says:

Heady but goes down easy I read a lot of books and am particularly fond of this kind of fiction where something about the near future is off or changes and the domino effect that follows. I never write reviews but feel like people should read this. My account is under my wife’s name but I’m a dude writing this and it just speaks to our times in a way that would be a tough pill to swallow written any other way. If you’ve read the synopsis, you get the gist– women become more powerful than men, basically… this book imagines that power dynamic to every degree and what every sexist injustice would look through that lens. I loved it so much and am not a big feminist book reader. The plot clips too. No tropes here– nothing predictable or anything I saw coming– a rarity. Best book I’ve read since All the Light We Cannot See. btw I’m in no way related or know the author

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