The Fifth Season (The Broken Earth)

“Intricate and extraordinary.” – New York Times on The Fifth Season (A New York Times Notable Book of 2015) WINNER OF THE HUGO AWARD FOR BEST NOVEL 2016 This is the way the world ends…for the last time. A season of endings has begun. It starts with the great red rift across the heart of

“Intricate and extraordinary.” – New York Times on The Fifth Season (A New York Times Notable Book of 2015)

WINNER OF THE HUGO AWARD FOR BEST NOVEL 2016

This is the way the world ends…for the last time.
A season of endings has begun.

It starts with the great red rift across the heart of the world’s sole continent, spewing ash that blots out the sun.

It starts with death, with a murdered son and a missing daughter.

It starts with betrayal, and long dormant wounds rising up to fester.

This is the Stillness, a land long familiar with catastrophe, where the power of the earth is wielded as a weapon. And where there is no mercy.

For more from N. K. Jemisin, check out:

The Inheritance Trilogy
The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms
The Broken Kingdoms
The Kingdom of Gods

The Inheritance Trilogy (omnibus edition)
Shades in Shadow: An Inheritance Triptych (e-only short fiction)
The Awakened Kingdom (e-only novella)

Dreamblood Duology
The Killing Moon
The Shadowed Sun

The Broken EarthThe Fifth SeasonThe Obelisk Gate

Comments

S. Addison says:

A new high point for Jemisin’s already-impressive career. I’ve enjoyed all of Jemisin’s books thus far, but I often avoid starting series books until the whole series is complete because I hate being left hanging, waiting for the next installment. But “The Fifth Season” was totally worth the suspense. The world of The Stillness – an ironically-named super-continent that suffers frequent, massive environmental catastrophes thanks to its unstable geology – is a captivating setting for the story’s three narrators, each of whom is forced to journey across the dangerous, shifting land. In conceiving a society able to do what it takes to survive across multiple devastating periods of disaster and climate change, Jemisin creates a world order that each of her main characters sees through different eyes: one hoping it will offer her refuge, one furious about its demands on her, and one hoping to just avoid its gaze altogether. 

Aaron Solomon says:

One of the finest writers of our time Well-deserving of the highest awards in the science fiction and fantasy genres. Mind-blowingly good. Have a few hours set aside before you open the book.

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