Sleeping Beauties: A Novel

#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER In this spectacular father/son collaboration, Stephen King and Owen King tell the highest of high-stakes stories: what might happen if women disappeared from the world of men?In a future so real and near it might be now, something happens when women go to sleep: they become shrouded in a cocoon-like

#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER

In this spectacular father/son collaboration, Stephen King and Owen King tell the highest of high-stakes stories: what might happen if women disappeared from the world of men?

In a future so real and near it might be now, something happens when women go to sleep: they become shrouded in a cocoon-like gauze. If they are awakened, if the gauze wrapping their bodies is disturbed or violated, the women become feral and spectacularly violent. And while they sleep they go to another place, a better place, where harmony prevails and conflict is rare.

One woman, the mysterious “Eve Black,” is immune to the blessing or curse of the sleeping disease. Is Eve a medical anomaly to be studied? Or is she a demon who must be slain? Abandoned, left to their increasingly primal urges, the men divide into warring factions, some wanting to kill Eve, some to save her. Others exploit the chaos to wreak their own vengeance on new enemies. All turn to violence in a suddenly all-male world.

Set in a small Appalachian town whose primary employer is a women’s prison, Sleeping Beauties is a wildly provocative, gloriously dramatic father-son collaboration that feels particularly urgent and relevant today.

Comments

Michael Hicks says:

Definitely Not King’s Best… Aside from Gwendy’s Button Box earlier this year, it’s been quite a few years since I’ve read anything from Stephen King. Although I count him as among my all-time favorite authors, and consider myself a fan, I regret that I’ve become something of a lapsed Constant Reader. Nevertheless, I had been looking forward to Sleeping Beauties for quite some time and when it finally released I had worked myself up into a good old solid hankering for an epic horror tome. 

James Tepper says:

More Owen than Stephen and not very good This is a painful review to write. I have read just about all Stephen King that has been published. I’ve also reviewed most of what I’ve read, giving an occasional 3 stars to an anthology or a short story, but the vast majority of my scores for novels have been 4’s and 5’s, mosly the latter. I can recognize King’s writing style anywhere. I knew (very strongly suspected) that THINNER was written by SK long before it became public knowledge that Richard Bachman was just a pseudonym that King used to prevent the market from being saturated by too many Stephen King novels in too short a time. 

Flossy Girl says:

I Just Dig this Kind of Thing so Hard Y’all Full disclosure, my King reviews are always positive because I have a deep and unshakable bias for my favorite author. I’ve been an obsessive fan of King for 30+ years and my response to his work always falls somewhere between “pretty entertained” and “wildly delighted.” Don’t look to for high brow analysis and in depth criticism (not that the material isn’t worthy of such examinations-that’s just not my bag. I will point out three things that were especially interesting to me about this book: 

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